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Say hello to my sister Emily! When she told me about the Culinary World Tour project she was doing with my niece, Madison, I thought it was about the coolest thing ever! Emily is a super busy, working, single mom (getting married next January!), so if she can cook these recipes, so can you! First stop, Tennessee Tea Cakes. YUM!

Kid's Culinary World Tour: Tennessee Tea Cakes

I am a cooking fanatic. I love to experiment with different food styles in the kitchen, often resulting in a pile of dirty dishes in the sink, a mess of ingredients scattered across the counter, and a very happy belly! One of my hopes as a mother was to share this love of food and cooking with my daughter, Madison. I dreamed of sharing my grandmother’s spaghetti sauce recipe, or the crepe recipe I learned from my mom, or basically anything from the late great Julia Childs (love her!).

And then I realized that my child is the pickiest eater. Ever. No matter how many delicious entrees I presented her with, she simply refused to try them. I tried everything. Literally, everything. I tried being patient, I tried applauding when she agreed just to TOUCH the food, I tried leaving her at the table until she finished it (only to find that her will was stronger than mine)… You name it, I tried it. And yet… day after day, meal after meal, I got shot down. Eventually I gave up for a while – all that rejection was hurting my pride!

With the arrival of summer, I decided it was time to tackle the picky eater problem again. This meant I needed to get creative. So I decided to take my daughter on a Culinary World Tour. I first told  her of far away places where the people speak different languages, and they eat different foods, listen to different music. That seemed to pique the interest of my little learner who is always in search of new bits of trivia to share with her friends.

Kid's Culinary World Tour: Tennessee Tea Cakes

“How would you like to visit and learn about all those amazing places without ever having to leave our kitchen?!” I asked, fingers crossed. “YES!” she screamed…. Oh thank you baby Jesus. We have a win. From there, I presented her with a notebook which would serve as her Culinary World Tour Passport and journal. Each day, we would pick a place (starting with the United States), learn some interesting facts about it and cook a recipe that is considered a local treat. In order to receive a stamp in the passport, she would need to do one thing: TRY at least 1 bite of each of the foods we made. She agreed to the terms (we shook on it… that’s a binding contract in this house). And the very next day we embarked on our Culinary World Tour!

Tennessee Tea Cakes

First Stop: Tennessee

Here we learned about and made Tennessee Tea Cakes. We started our little excursion by researching the location on the internet and finding fun facts about the local cuisine and culture. We learned that Tennesse Tea Cakes were created as a result of food rationing during the Civil War. To celebrate a birthday, instead of making a birthday cake, they had to make smaller versions (imagine trying to share a cupcake with your family!). Madison wrote about the place in her food passport/journal, and we threw on our aprons to start baking! But not before we put on a little Tennessee music to fit the theme: Madison. Meet Elvis. Someday I’ll tell you about how I was in love with him when I was 8… or maybe I’ll leave that part out.

Our first excursion was a tremendous success! Madison (and I) LOVED the Tennessee Tea Cakes! We’ll definitely be making them again! Next stop on our Culinary World Tour: New York!

Kid's Culinary World Tour: Tennessee Tea Cakes

Lemon Honey-Almond Tea Cakes

  • 1 2/3 cups confectioners’ sugar plus additional for dusting
  • ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup almond flour or finely ground almonds
  • 6 large egg whites
  • 13 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • Finely grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  1. Grease a 12 cup muffin tin; set aside. In a bowl, combine the sugar, all purpose flour, and almond flour.
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer, whisk the egg whites until frothy. Slowly whisk in the sugar mixture.
  3. Whisk in the melted butter, the honey, lemon zest and lemon juice.
  4. Divide the batter among the muffin cups. Refrigerate for 1 hour.
  5. Preheat oven to 375°F.
  6. Bake for 15 to 17 minutes or until dark golden around the edges and firm to the touch.
  7. Immediately remove the cakes from the muffin tin and transfer to a wire rack to cool.
  8. Dust cakes with additional confectioners’ sugar (oops, we couldn’t wait to try them so we skipped that step!) just before serving.

Makes 12 mini cakes

This recipe was found in The Deen Brothers Recipes from the Road Cookbook

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Echo

    July 19, 2015 at 12:38 am

    I love this!!!! What a great and fun idea!

  2. Kim~madeinaday

    July 21, 2015 at 3:26 pm

    What a cute way to teach kids about the different dishes around the culinary world! Thank you so much for linking up to Merry Monday this week! I am sharing your post today on my twitter! We hope to see you next week for another great party! Have a great week!
    Best,
    Kim

    • Katy Blevins

      July 25, 2015 at 7:26 am

      Thank you Kim! Stay tuned for more fun! We’ve got some great recipes to share from all over the world. My sister is really rocking this project! Thanks for hosting Merry Monday. Have a fabulous weekend, friend. 🙂

  3. Kirsten

    July 25, 2015 at 7:19 pm

    Love, love, love this idea! Have some ideas if you want a guest post, just let me know!

    • Katy Blevins

      July 26, 2015 at 8:12 am

      Yes!!! Please email me Kirsten! I would love to have you as a guest post for this series. 🙂

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Easy Healthy Recipes

10 Tips for the Perfect Party Platter

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Whether hosting an intimate dinner party or catering to the masses, a party platter should exude a feeling of bountiful goodness, quality and understated elegance.

If seeking to make an impression, this is no time for the salted crackers or frozen mini pizzas to make an appearance. Lavish servings of Lavosh and home-made dips counterpointed by exotic fruits in a range of colours, should be the order of the day.

Think of the platter as a tasting plate overflowing with rare and delicious goodies that guests may never before have experienced. If the first bite is with the eye then the party platter should be a masterpiece, foretelling the sumptuousness of the main meal to follow.

Tip 1 — Presentation

Dedicated or scrupulously cleaned wooden chopping boards are the ideal medium for displaying your platter to its best advantage. There is a rustic, earthy and organic feel to them which cannot be replicated in plastic or other materials.

The word ‘dedicated’ means it is used strictly for the purpose of serving rather than to prepare food.

While wooden chopping boards have been proven safer than plastic ones due to the fact that they tend to have less deep furrows for bacteria to thrive, research has also found salmonella and other bacteria doesn’t survive on wood like it does on plastic.

It is still imperative that you clean your wooden chopping boards meticulously before every use. Whilst cleaning, inspect the surface for deep grooves, mould or staining, which all indicate it is time for a new board.

Tip 2 — Centrepieces

Set a central focus point on your platter and branch out from there. Hollow out a round cottage loaf, cabbage, capsicum or similar and fill with homemade dip. Many foodstuffs with a hard exterior can be used in this way to excellent effect.

Stunning ramekins filled with homemade sauces and dips, surrounded by sushi, prawns, smoked salmon parcels and lobster, will elicit gasps of delight. Consider emptying a lobster shell, mixing the contents into a seafood dip or Mornay, returning the mixture to the shell and serve ringed by lashings of warm bread or pita.

The ever popular dessert platter is perfect for lakes of melted chocolate in lavish, heated serving tureens or fountains; surrounded by strawberries, marshmallows and skewers for dipping.

Tip 3 — Crackers and dippers

Vegetables and Middle Eastern breads make nutritious, colourful and tasty dippers including Lavosh crackers, Turkish breads, carrot sticks, red capsicum and celery. Use foods which will remain crunchy for the length of the function.

Warm falafel balls on toothpicks can also double as scoops for exotic dips.

Tip 4 — Texturing

Something cold, something hot, something crunchy, something smooth – give diners variety whilst exciting both the eye and the taste buds.

If serving large groups, roll meats into easy to pick up parcels. Utilise unusual and interesting receptacles full of bite-sized portions such as porcelain spoons which can be easily picked up by guests.

Fold, roll, layer or fan meats out in an arc and garnish with radish roses, coriander or other fresh herbs, kale or cheeses. Hot finger foods can be interspersed with unusual yet tasty dipping sauces and leafy greens.

Tip 5 — A touch of the exotic

Take a stroll around a large fruit shop to select colourful, exotic or tropical fruits. Get creative with the presentation. Cut fruit into intricate shapes, florets and roses. Avoid pitted fruit which may present a choking hazard. Some suggestions to get you started are:

  • Figs
  • Berries
  • Passionfruit
  • Lychees
  • Mango
  • Papaya
  • Kiwi
  • Dates
  • Pomegranates
  • Pineapple

Tip 6 — Choosing cheeses

Serve cheeses on a separate platter, identifying them with rustic cheese labels. These can be purchased, printed at home or better still fashioned DIY style from corks or small chalk boards. The more creative the better!

When using this idea it is best to have a wide variety of cheeses in small quantities of each. Go for a mixture of crumbly, smooth, mild, pungent and tasty.

Some suggestions may be:

  • Goat
  • Gouda
  • Brie
  • Blue
  • Gruyere
  • Cheddar
  • Parmesan
  • Feta

Try to get a mixed variety of tastes, textures and colours. For instance, Brie and Camembert have a similar consistency and presentation, so you may choose to avoid having both. Display cheeses with a selection of dried and fresh fruit and nuts to set them off to best advantage. Don’t forget the cheese knife!

Tip 7 — Get creative with colour

The party platter should not merely be about taste, it needs to be visually captivating. Consider the occasion and build a palette of colours based on that. Examples of this are Australia Day or St Patrick’s Day. A national flag can be created using a variety of complementary foods.

Begin with these ‘colourful’ tips:

  • Whites – Australian feta, cauliflower florets, tzatziki dip or brie
  • Blues – Blueberries interspersed with tropical blue flower leaves
  • Reds – Stuffed cherry tomatoes, sundried tomatoes, red capsicum, strawberries
  • Yellows – pineapple, cheddar cheese, lemon
  • Oranges – carrot sticks, mandarins, American cheese
  • Greens – olives, kiwi fruit, beans, broccoli florets

Try to incorporate typically national foods to create the effect and continue the theme. An example of this could be a Mexican flag fashioned from white corn chips, salsa and jalapenos.

Tip 8 — Theming

Catering to large groups using multiple platters, affords the opportunity to build a theme into each serving tray.

Mix spices, garnishes and dipping sauces, in with the following:

  • Seafood – oysters, caviar, prawns, lobster, warm fish balls, seafood croquettes and hot seafood rolls. Use rock salt or crushed ice as a bed.
  • Meat – salumi including prosciutto, bresaola, mortadella, salami
  • Vegetarian – olives, dolmades, cherry tomatoes, fetta, falafel balls

Alternately, platters can be themed by cuisine – Mexican, Italian, Thai and Chinese are some popular suggestions. Source or make little national flags to decorate each platter.

Other ways to personalise platters is to create artwork using specific foods. For instance the Netherlands – fashion feta stuffed tomatoes into tulips with spring onion stems and voila, you have spectacular national emblem!

Include a selection of tasting and dipping sauces tailored to complement the flavours.

Tip 9 — Simple savouries

The combination of olive oil with a dash of balsamic vinegar is always a favourite. Serve garnished with sprigs of fresh herbs like sage or parsley plus a side of fine grain sea salt.

Offer a range of heavy breads for dipping and surround with traditional European fare like olives, feta and prosciutto.

Tip 10 — Filling in the gaps

A party platter should be about displaying abundance and variety. Garnishes and edible greens such as lettuce leaves, mint and parsley are all colourful and luxuriant bases from which to present or set off a platter to best advantage. Replace food often to avoid the appearance of the platter having been ‘picked over’.

When seeking to make a lasting impression, putting energy and thought into planning and fashioning superb food platters can be time well spent. The colours and contents can form a delicious and eye-catching prelude to the main meal or be a parade of main courses in themselves.

Sumptuously presented food arrangements can encourage socialisation and stimulate the gastronomic juices. So get your artistic talents flowing to create magnificent platters which will make your next function a resounding success.

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Easy Healthy Recipes

Five Easy Recipes for “Make Your Own Dinner” Nights

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Easy Dinner Recipes

We have all been there – you plan as well as you can, search for recipes, go grocery shopping, make dinner – and your child refuses to eat.  You then have to make the decision whether to stand your ground and make him eat what you’ve made, or avoid the whining and make that box of macaroni and cheese.  

Ideally, your child would realize that perfectly balanced recipe you’ve spent time preparing is both nutritious and delicious, but in the real world, this is rarely the case.  

The five “Make Your Own Dinner” night recipes below are designed to let everyone make their meal how they like it best, without creating a separate menu for each person in your family.  An added bonus to these recipes is that they allow children to take ownership of their nutrition and promote autonomy and independence in eating habits.  

Parents Preparing Family Breakfast In Kitchen

1. Grilled Cheese and Tomato Soup

What you need:  

Bread, butter, varied types of cheese (American, swiss, provolone, etc.);

Tomato Soup;

Goldfish crackers, shredded cheese, croutons, crumbled bacon, chicken breast, sour cream – the possibilities are endless!  

What you do:

Let each person pick out what type (or types) of cheese they want on their sandwich, heat up some tomato soup, and let your cooks get creative dressing up the soup and creating flavor combinations.

2. Tacos

What you need:

Hard or soft taco shells;

Meat (ground beef, chicken, steak or pork);

Lettuce, tomato, sour cream, guacamole, hot sauce, salsa, rice, beans, corn, onions, peppers, etc.

What you do:

Use a mild taco seasoning on the meat of your choice and let your family choose the spices, veggies, and sauces they like best.  Cook the meat, cut the veggies you need, and put everything in bowls for your family to pick and choose from.  If your kids are a little older, let them help dice the tomato or chop the onions.  

3. Pizza

What you need:  

Traditional pizza crust, flatbread, or get creative with biscuits, bagels or even English muffins;

Sauces, which can be red (tomato) or white (usually alfredo sauce);

Any type of shredded cheese;

Toppings, toppings, toppings!  Again, the possibilities are endless.  Vegetables, meat, fruit, barbeque chicken.  Your choices are only limited by your imagination.

What you do:

If necessary, bake the pizza crust according to directions.  Set out the sauces and toppings and see who can make the most unique, tasty pizza!  

4. Baked Potato Bar

What you need:  

Russet potatoes;

Shredded cheese and meats for protein, sour cream, ranch dressing, onions, chives, broccoli, etc.

What you do:

You can do so much with a simple baked potato.  Have a Mexican baked potato by adding ground beef, taco sauce, lettuce and tomato.  Make it more traditional by adding cheese and broccoli, or go all out with turkey, cheese, onion and bacon.  

5. Kabobs

What you need:  

Steak, chicken, cubed pork, or shrimp;

Seasoning;

Assorted vegetables (peppers, zucchini, onions, etc.) and even fruit (pineapple and pork is a delicious combination!);

Skewers

What you do:

Each person can stack their kabobs to their liking.  Encourage your cooks to experiment with combinations or something they’ve never tried before.  Maybe your son swears he hates shrimp, but may be surprised when he tries it grilled with tasty vegetables and seasoning.

Grill the kabobs (this doesn’t take long) and serve with rice or another side of your choosing.

Let’s Eat!

Spend quality time with your family while making delicious, nutritious meals together.  Do you have a favorite, go-to recipe you make often?  Think about how you can turn it into a “Make Your Own” night!  The five recipes above are just the beginning of inclusive family meals.

 

 

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Easy Healthy Recipes

Not-Your-Mama’s Shepherd’s Pie Recipe

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Here’s another awesome recipe from our resident cooking enthusiast, Emily Steadman. I’ve personally tasted this recipe… SO. GOOD. Enjoy! -KB

Ahh Spring… the flowers are blooming… the birds are singing…. my car is frozen shut—Wait.. What?! Oh that’s right, I live in New England… the arctic tundra that refuses to acknowledge the vernal equinox. It is April. And this week my daughter slipped and fell on a sheet of ice walking to the car… aforementioned car was frozen shut and I had to begrudgingly remove the ice scraper from the trunk (where I had ceremoniously placed it TWO WEEKS AGO, signifying it would no longer be needed and heralding the arrival of Spring) to crack the glistening sheet of suck that encased the entire car. Ok. Rant over.

Because the cold just refuses to go away, I think this is the perfect time to share one of my absolute favorite recipes. It is a staple in our house through the winter, and as I can’t seem to get warm right now, it’s all I can think about! Let me preface this with a warning that this recipe is not a quick, 5 ingredient fix. It takes a little time and a little love but the end result is so deliciously worth it – I promise! It’s a great weekend meal, and we usually make it on Saturdays or Sundays when my daughter and I can throw on our aprons and spend the day in the kitchen, listening to music and salivating over the smells coming from the stove.

Since I was a kid, the words “Shepherd’s Pie” would make me immediately lose my appetite. It was a frequent meal in our house and the idea of mixing ground beef with frozen veggies was just unpleasant. I used to make my mother separate all the ingredients because I refused to eat them all mashed up (I now realize that payback for this has come in the form of my own child being the world’s pickiest eater). So as an adult, I didn’t even consider Shepherd’s Pie as an option for meals I’d want to cook. But I found a few recipes on Pinterest that sparked my interest and decided to give it another try. This recipe from iowagirleats.com was the one that started my downward spiral into Shepherd’s Pie obsession. I made some changes to suit my tastes and ended up with what is now my family’s favorite recipe.

I should warn you that anyone you cook this meal for will most likely want to hug you after the first bite. It is that good.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs chuck roast (trim a little excess fat but not too much – it adds flavor!)
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large carrot (peeled and chopped)
  • 2 celery stalks (peeled and chopped)
  • ½ yellow onion (diced)
  • 1 cup portabella mushrooms (diced)
  • 2 cloves garlic (minced)
  • 1 small bunch of fresh Thyme (remove leaves from stems)
  • 3 Tbsp cornstarch
  • 3 cups red wine
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 2 tbsp worstershire sauce
  • 2-3 lbs potatoes (peeled and chopped)
  • ½ stick of butter
  • ¾ c milk or cream
  • 1 ½ c shredded white cheddar
  • Salt and pepper

Directions:

Cut the chuck roast into large chunks and season liberally on all sides with coarse salt and pepper. Heat oil in a large pot or dutch oven over medium high heat. Sear the top and bottom of the chuck roast pieces for about 3-4 minutes per side. You should see a nice golden crust. Make sure to sear off any fat.

Remove chuck roast pieces from pot and place in separate bowl. Turn the heat down to medium and add the garlic to the pot. Saute for no more than 30 seconds before adding onion, carrot, celery and mushrooms. Cook for about 8 minutes until vegetables are tender. Add thyme leaves to pot.

Add the chuck roast pieces back into the pot and mix with the cooked vegetables. Sprinkle with cornstarch, stir and cook for 1 minute.

Add wine, beef broth, and worstershire. Place a lid on the pot, reduce heat to medium low and let the mixture simmer for 2 hours, stir occasionally to rotate the beef.

After 2 hours, remove the meat from the pot and shred. If the mixture is still not thickened after 2 hours, place over medium high heat and simmer until thickened before returning shredded beef to the pot.

30 minutes before the meat is finished braising, boil the diced potatoes until tender. Drain the water from the pot, mash the potatoes and add butter, milk (or cream) and 1 cup of shredded white cheddar. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Transfer the meat and vegetable mixture from the pot to a casserole dish (make sure you put it on a baking sheet in case it bubbles over in the oven!). Spread the mashed potatoes on top of the meat mixture and sprinkle remaining shredded cheddar on top.

Bake in a 350° oven for 10 minutes, and then broil until a golden brown crust forms on top of the potatoes.

Serve and enjoy!

 

 

 

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